What’s New in the March/April 2010 Issue of Script

Man of the Moment:
Noah Baumbach

by Bob Verini

Over the years, Noah Baumbach’s films have, consciously or not, chronicled the ups and downs of Generation X. His newest movie, Greenberg, tackles a difficult character who is faced with recovering from a breakdown and making himself a better person … in spite of himself.

Alice in Wonderland

by Aaron Ginsburg

Scribe Linda Woolverton leads us down the rabbit hole as she discusses her personal take on Alice’s return to Wonderland, working with director Tim Burton, and how a dark time in her own life helped her write a film audiences won’t soon forget.

Writers on Writing: A Nightmare on Elm Street

by Eric Heisserer

A general meeting surprisingly landed writer Eric Heisserer the job of bringing back one of the most frightening villains of the 80s. He takes us into the franchise reboot of A Nightmare on Elm Street and the many challenges he faced—including the origins of Freddy Krueger and the role of sleep patterns—in ratcheting up the fear factor.

A Kick-Ass Interview

by Jeffrey Berman

Kick-Ass is not your typical comic book. The super-violent series follows an ordinary kid who puts on a costume and fights crime as a real-life superhero. Filmmaker Matthew Vaughn read the comic and decided to adapt it—before the series was even completed. Script talks to Vaughn, scribe Jane Goldman, creator Mark Millar, and illustrator John Romita Jr. about how the project came to life.

The Rebels of Writing

by Zack Gutin

It’s not often that two independently successful screenwriters work on the same film without one rewriting the other. And, with the current economy, selling a pitch for $2 million doesn’t happen very often either. But, somehow, Simon Kinberg and Aline Brosh McKenna have recently managed to accomplish both.

The 10 Biggest Unproduced Specs of the 90s

by Jim Cirile

In the 90s, studios were buying specs for big money, and bidding wars were in the trades almost every week. Some of those scripts went on to become movies that de- fined the decade. But what about those other high-dollar specs that went unproduced? Script decided to find out.

How to Sell a Pitch in Only 10 Years!

by Dave Pullano

While working the front desk at Miramax, Dave Pullano created the fictional exec Jay Flannick to field unwanted and overly persistent pitches. Ironically enough, through a series of ad- ventures, Pullano found himself in Hong Kong, sitting on an old mattress … and pitching his own script to Jackie Chan.

Navigating 2010’s Staffing Season

by Chad Gervich

Television is a cold business, and no time is colder than the beginning of summer for TV writers hoping to land a staff job. To avoid the freeze, learn how staffing works, how it’s changed in the recent years, and how to prepare yourself for the new season.

Two “Unbrandable” Hollywood Scribes Reflect on the Writer’s Life

by by Ray Morton

Eric Johnson and Paul Tamasy are living the life that aspiring scribes daydream about. Sure, they sometimes hit the beach while working and visit The Polo Lounge for an occasional martini, but what is the writer’s life really like for one of Hollywood’s busiest writing teams?

The Paradox of Success

by Jennifer M. Wood

With spending habits changing in Hollywood, the question to writers becomes: Do you want to sell a script, or do you want to make a movie?

What You Really Want to Do is Direct

by Robert Piluso

You’re ready to become a hyphenate and get behind a camera. But before you start bud- geting that feature spec, consider walking before you run and make a few shorts first.

Perception Management

by Carole M. Kirschner

A Hollywood executive for 15 years, Carole Kirschner has had more than 5,000 meetings and helped to hire more than 400 writers … and some decisions ultimately came down to how the writers presented themselves. Read the advice she gives scribes on how to manage their images and influence the way decision-makers perceive them.

Script Secrets: Read My Script!

by William Martell

After listening to around 75 pitches at the Raindance Film Festival, professional screenwriter Bill Martell tells you where some went wrong and others went right.

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Script has been the leading source for information on the craft and business of writing for film and television since 1995. With inside information, articles written by working writers and filmmakers, and in-depth interviews, Script is the resource on every scriptwriter's must-read list.

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