writer’s edge

new sitcom structure seinfeld

Writer’s Edge: New Structure For Sitcoms

In the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s, the structure for sitcoms was one single plot line from the beginning to the end of the episode. An example would be a wife tries to keep the dent she put in the fender of the family car, a secret from her husband. Starting in...

Writer’s Edge: The Best High Concept Idea Ever

Having sold eight High Concept projects myself, I can appreciate a great idea when I hear it. The best one I’ve ever heard is a movie script called, Top Ten that sold for seven figures. Every time I’ve told the logline of that movie to my writing students, each one of...

Writer’s Edge: Costly Mistakes Writers Make

By Steve Kaire This is a serious error I believe many new screenwriters are making. It’s holding back their success and most of them don’t even realize it. The advent of the Internet has made research convenient and accessible to the masses. Social media is now a phenomenon that has blossomed...

Writer’s Edge: Why The Drama Genre Is So Hard to Sell

By Steve Kaire I attended an agents and managers panel in Los Angeles this past spring. When the event was winding down, audience members asked if they could submit their material for possible representation. Each member of the panel had the same answer. They’d consider every genre except one – drama. After...

Writer’s Edge: Every Script Needs A Character Arc

Character arc is the change one of your main characters goes through from the beginning of your story until the end. Every well written screenplay should have at least one character who learns something major and changes his behavior or attitude in the course of the script. In the drama, Rain...